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Iridology

The science and art of observing marks in the iris that occur as reflex responses to specific tissue conditions in each body system/organ. Information from each organ is conveyed by nerve connections and it terminates in the corresponding sector 

of the right or left iris, causing changes visible upon magnification as variously shaped and coloured marks.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR TAKING IRIS PHOTOS

Iridology is a most useful way for Mary-Lou to support your health profile, and can provide information that saves a significant amount of money, and time, in laboratory and/or blood tests*

 

(*NB! This in no way replaces the value of tests where we need further assessment, or cannot identify causes or associated organ imbalances that need more research, but it is a great way to potentially rule out unnecessary testing.)

 

By doing an iridolology assessment as a preliminary measure, means that there is no need, initially, to spend additional time going for a blood draw, or collect and send samples for laboratories to analyse, and then send the results to Mary-Lou for further analysis.

If you choose to add this assessment value to your health profile, simply follow this link to book and pay for your Iridology Assessment here.

 

Simply follow the instructions below carefully and send your photos to Mary-Lou, to identify where your body has historic and/or present imbalances in your organs and body systems. 

 

PLEASE NOTE: 

THIS MAY FEEL LIKE A VERY LONG AND DETAILED SET OF INSTRUCTIONS, AS YOU READ THROUGH IT. 

PLEASE PERSEVERE, AS IF THE PHOTOS ARE NOT CLEAR, THEY ARE NOT 'READABLE', AND YOU WILL BE ASKED TO TAKE THEM AGAIN, WHICH IS FAR MORE TIME CONSUMING THAN SPENDING A BIT MORE TIME ON THE INSTRUCTIONS AT FIRST. 

Much appreciated ❤️

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR TAKING IRIS PHOTOS:

Script for clients to take photographs of their irises, for an online iridology assessment by Mary-Lou Harris:

 

What is the Iris?

It is the round coloured disc, in the middle of your eyes, surrounding the black pupil.

Iris colours tend to be in varying shades of brown, amber, blue, green, or grey.

 

What is the Sclera?

This is the eye whites that are on both sides of the Iris.

 

Equipment for taking the iris photos:

  1. Any recent (2-3 year old) Android or iPhone (12 and up) will work with a little help from these instructions.

  2. You will need your phone camera  (rear, not Selfie)

  3. You will need to purchase a nurse's pen light torch with two light settings. You will use the softer of the two light settings, NOT the bright white light. Here is an Amazon link if you wish to purchase the pen light torch (less than £7) Mary Lou uses this one: https://amzn.to/3R64s0I

  4. You will ideally need someone to help you, as it is very difficult to take a good quality photo of your own eyes without someone else to support you. You will be the 'subject' and the other person will take the photograph (i.e. photographer)

 

Camera settings: 

  1. Open your phone camera

  2. Find the settings icon

  3. Set your rear camera (NOT the front camera where you take selfies) to the HIGHEST  resolution possible (if you can't find it on your phone, send Mary-Lou the name of the model of your phone,  and I'll Google it, and try to help you with this) (e.g. The Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus' max screen resolution is 2,960x1,440 pixels (also known as WQHD+), but did you know that the phone defaults to 2,220x1,080 pixels (FHD+)? The more conservative setting preserves battery life, but for maximum detail, you should adjust the setting up to the highest resolution.

  4. Find the 'VOICE CONTROL' and turn it on. This will enable you to say the words 'shoot', 'cheese' or 'smile' which will activate the camera to make it easier to take the picture without moving. (be careful not to say a word that will feel like an instruction (e.g. smile) to the person being photographed. When choosing your camera word choose a softer-sounding word like 'cheese' and say it softly. A word like 'shoot' moves your chest and arms, and you will most likely have a subtle movement of the phone in your hand, which may result in a blurred picture. 

 

Preparation for taking the photos:

 

Subject's instructions:

  1. Seat yourself in such a way that you are positioned directly in front of the photographer, in a way that is easy for them to take a 'mugshot' style photograph of each of your irises.

  2. This is essential as you need to be looking directly ahead, so that the eye whites (sclera) show up equally, on both sides of the Iris which should be centered in the middle of your eye. Therefore you should be looking directly at the camera lens.

  3. It can be most helpful to steady your face (as well as the photographer steadying the camera) by placing your chin on a stack of books

  4. While the photographer follows the instructions below, it is very important that you sit as still as possible, and open your eyes as wide as possible, so that as much of the round Iris can be seen clearly without any blur, or you will be requested to send more photographs in, that are clearer.

  5. You should not be gazing at a window, a mirror, or a monitor as any light source will leave reflections that blur the iris detail, making it difficult or impossible to assess. This includes lights turned on in the room you are in. NATURAL LIGHT inside during the day (not right next to a window) is preferable.

  6. Window reflection: See the photos below of the eyes (reflection on the right side of the iris reflects the window in the room, with daylight streaming through, as well as the stereo and water bottle)  Therefore please do not take the photos next to/near a window. Either close the curtains, or take the photo at night if not possible to move away from the window. See the reflection on the iris of that side of the room, making that side of the iris unreadable.

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Useful suggestions for getting the clearest photographs:

If you tend to squint, or can't open your eyes wide enough to get the full circle of the Iris in the photo (I.e. your upper and/or eyelids droop over, or cover the top or bottom of the iris 'circle')   you’ll need to lift both eyelids (separately - not at the same time) as per the instructions below, and get the upper hemisphere of the Iris by lifting your top eyelid on one, and pulling down the lower lashes on another, photo:

Left Upper eyelid: Raise your right arm and reach it around the back of your head, bringing your hand forward over the top of your left eye. Gently place your 2 middle fingers DIRECTLY ON THE MIDDLE of your top left eyelid (NOT on, or near, the left or right corners) and lightly pull the eyelid UP, to reveal the sclera under the eyelid, above the top curve of your iris (12 o'clock position). Hold this very still while the photographer takes the photo.

Right Upper eyelid: Raise your left arm and reach it around the back of your head, bringing your hand forward over the top of your right eye. Gently place your 2 middle fingers DIRECTLY ON THE MIDDLE of your top right eyelid (NOT on, or near, the left or right corners) and lightly pull the eyelid UP, to reveal the sclera under the eyelid, above the top curve of your iris (12 o'clock position) Hold this very still while the photographer takes the photo.

Left Lower eyelash area: Bring your left arm to your lower lash area and gently place your 2 middle fingers DIRECTLY ON THE SOFT SKIN IN THE MIDDLE of the area just under your left eyelashes (NOT on, or near, the left or right corners) and lightly pull the eyelashes DOWN, to reveal the sclera under the eyelashes, below the bottom curve of your iris (6 o'clock position). Hold this very still while the photographer takes the photo.

Right Lower eyelash area: Bring your right arm to your lower lash area and gently place your 2 middle fingers DIRECTLY ON THE SOFT SKIN IN THE MIDDLE of the area just under your right eyelashes (NOT on, or near, the left or right corners) and lightly pull the eyelashes DOWN, to reveal the sclera under the eyelashes, below the bottom curve of your iris (6 o'clock position). Hold this very still while the photographer takes the photo.

 

Photographer's instructions:

  1. Don’t shoot outdoors.

  2. Your subject should not be gazing at a window, a mirror, or a monitor as any light source will leave reflections that blur the iris detail, making it difficult or impossible to assess. This includes lights turned on in the room you are in. NATURAL LIGHT inside during the day (not right next to a window) is preferable.

  3. Ideally, do not use a camera flash function, as a flash is not usually needed when shooting indoors in normal lighting, as this can  create artificial 'marks' or a haze, or shadow to appear on the sclera and irises, making them unreadable 

  4. Seat the subject whose irises are being photographed, with you positioned directly in front of them, in a way that is easy to take a 'mugshot' style photograph.

  5. This is essential as the subject needs to be looking directly ahead of them, so that the eye whites (sclera) show up equally, on both sides of the Iris which should be centered in the middle of the eye.

  6. It can be most helpful for your subject to steady their face (as described in the Subject's instructions above) as well as for you to steady the camera, by placing your elbow or arm on the back of a chair) if you notice small movements when you take the photos.

  7. The closer the camera is to the subject, the more likely that the tiniest fraction of a movement will upset the focus, making it impossible to assess the iris.

  8. So start by holding the camera three (3) or even up to six (6) inches away from the eye being photographed, in order to avoid this. If you get more of the face that's no problem, as Mary-Lou can always crop the photo, to just include the iris.

  9. This distance applies to both the camera and the torch.

  10. Take the pen light torch and turn it on, to the weakest yellow/amber light setting.

 

Photographing the eye:

  1. Place the pen light torch in your non-dominant hand, and align it horizontally with the floor

  2. Move the pen light torch forward, towards your subject's temple, until the light bulb end is approximately 3 inches or slightly more, away from their face

  3. Point the light from the pen light torch directly at the subject's left temple, just behind where the two eyelids meet at the outer edge of the eye, so it does not temporarily blind your subject.

  4. Keeping the pen light torch horizontal, very slightly lower your hand so that the pen light torch is aligned with your subject's cheekbone.

  5. Now slightly tilt the pen light torch forward, toward the front of the face, so that the beam of the light is at a 45° angle, and lights up the entire Iris and sclera.

  6. Ensure that this light beam is stable on the area of the eye being photographed

  7. Now, using your dominant hand, hold the camera about 3-6 inches from the eye being photographed, tap the screen where the eye shows up (this should be available if you have a pro mode or similar on your camera)

  8. Ensure that the whole eye is in the picture, and say the word 'shoot' or 'cheese' and the camera should automatically take the picture. Using the softer word command (e.g. 'cheese' instead of 'shoot') ensures that you can keep the camera very still, as any movement, no matter how slight, will make it difficult to impossible to read the iris.

  9. Now move to the other eye, and repeat the above instructions.

 

Submitting your photos:

Please take a few photos of each eye (ideally between 3 and 5) so that Mary-Lou may choose the best quality picture to assess.

Once you feel confident that you have the clearest photos possible (see examples of clear photos vs unreadable irises below) please save them in a jpeg format, and email them to Mary-Lou, at marylouharrisnutrition@gmail.com

Please send all the photographs as an attachment to an email (rather than in the body of the email) ideally one photograph at a time, but a Zip file is fine as long as Mary-Lou can open it.

Examples of clear photos vs unreadable irises:


Unclear and unreadable photos: can NOT be assessed and will need to be redone:

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Photo from Mary-Lou Harris.jpg

Clear and readable photos:  can be assessed:

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Correct 1.JPG

If the photos need to be re-shot due to 'unreadability', Mary-Lou will make suggestions for changes to your photography experience, and wait for the new photos, before proceeding with the iridology assessment part of your Health and Wellness Consultation. The consultation can still go ahead, with the additional assessment done thereafter, but before you receive your Health Improvement Recommendations after the consultation. 

 

Your photographs will all be treated in the highest confidentiality and will be incorporated into any other health work we are doing with you, be it Functional Physiology and Nutrition, Nervous System and Trauma Regulation, and/or Brain inflammation and other brain related support work.

 

Additional charges may apply:

Please note that this Added Value Iridology Assessment Support will incur an additional cost to the consultation fee, which will be reflected on your booking link 

 

I look forward to supporting you further, with dedication and commitment ♡

 

Much Love

Mary-Lou Harris (FdSc, Dip ION, ITEC, RHFP, SACOCT)

 

UK Mobile (cell) number + What's App: +44 (0)7747 888353

 

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